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Four-wheel-drive owners targeted in major police crackdown on modified vehicles in Queensland

Modified four-wheel-drives are being targeted in a new crackdown by Australian police.

New training for Queensland Police has been implemented in the past week to help officers identify illegally modified vehicles.

A three-day training course saw officers stationed in both static and moving patrols, hitting the owners of cars that have too much work done with hefty fines.

But owners are hitting back at the crackdown, saying it’s not that clear what the rules actually are.

New training is seeing Queensland Police cracking down on four-wheel-drive modifications

New training is seeing Queensland Police cracking down on four-wheel-drive modifications

The modification being targeted is how high the car can be raised.

Under state law, owners of a four-wheel-drive in Queensland are able to raise their car by up to 50mm without needing certification. Anything more and a permit is required.

The issue in question is the state’s difference to the maximum allowed modification with a permit.

Under Queensland law, the most a vehicle can be raised is 125mm, but under federal law states it is 150mm.

Queensland officers are being trained to enforce the lower of the two amounts.

The state government is working towards changing their legislation to comply with the rest of the country, Seven News reports.

The stricter laws will continue to be enforced in the meantime.

The maximum legal height of modification in Queensland is 125mm, whereas the rest of Australia is 150mm

The maximum legal height of modification in Queensland is 125mm, whereas the rest of Australia is 150mm

A common issue people have with the restrictions is the fact there isn’t a single body or authority to check their car’s compliance with.

Lawyer Andrew Wiseman said: ‘If people had one website or one body to approach for compliance, it would make life a lot easier for everyone.’

Four-wheel-driving enthusiast and ARB State Manager Roger Vickery says the rules can be confusing and over-complicated. 

His best advice for drivers unsure if their vehicle is legal or not is to approach a professional modifier and simply ask.

Dozens of newly trained officers are rolled out across Brisbane and the Gold Coast (pictured)

Dozens of newly trained officers are rolled out across Brisbane and the Gold Coast (pictured)

Throngs of newly trained officers have been spotted across Brisbane and the Gold Coast, handing out fines and impounding vehicles.

One man, Brendan Dawson has been driving his raised four-wheel-drive for five years. 

On Wednesday, it was deemed illegal and defected.

He received a defective vehicle repair notice and two infringement notices, he told MyGC.

‘I’ve been driving around for five years now and I’ve never had a problem or felt that it was unsafe,’ he said.

Senior Sargeant Shane Panoho told Seven News the purpose of the laws was to prevent any collisions being worse than they already would be.

He says if a raised car hits an un-raised one, the collision point will also be above where the car’s safety measures are in place.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk