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Prince William reveals Kate is ‘jealous’ of his trip to Africa

Prince William has revealed that Kate is ‘immensely jealous’ of his trip to Africa – as he’ll finally get a good night’s sleep away from his ‘wonderful children’.

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, admitted he was particularly looking forward to a ‘few good uninterrupted nights’ sleep’ while attending a reception in Windhoek, Namibia.

Addressing guests on Tuesday night, he said that he was ‘delighted to be visiting Namibia for the first time’, adding ‘I am only sorry that my wife Catherine is not able to join me.’ 

The Duchess of Cambridge, 36, has stayed at home to look after the couple’s young children Prince George, five, Princess Charlotte, three, and Prince Louis, who is just five months old.  

 Prince William (pictured meeting rangers in Namibia) has revealed Kate is 'immensely jealous' of his trip to Africa - as he'll finally get a good night's sleep away from his 'wonderful children'

 Prince William (pictured meeting rangers in Namibia) has revealed Kate is ‘immensely jealous’ of his trip to Africa – as he’ll finally get a good night’s sleep away from his ‘wonderful children’

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, said he was 'sorry that my wife Catherine is not able to join me' while addressing guests at a reception in Namibia. Pictured is Kate on the Buckingham Palace balcony for the RAF centenary in July 

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, said he was ‘sorry that my wife Catherine is not able to join me’ while addressing guests at a reception in Namibia. Pictured is Kate on the Buckingham Palace balcony for the RAF centenary in July 

William arrived in Namibia on Monday and is now in Tanzania, where he is finding out more about measures being taken to combat the illegal wildlife trade.

He will also visit Kenya later this week, where he proposed to Kate, before returning to the UK on Sunday.

Kensington Palace says the royal is making the ‘private working trip’ as president of the United for Wildlife group and patron of Tusk, another conservation organization.

The prince has campaigned against the killing of elephants, rhinos, pangolins and other species.  

William (above, in Namibia) admitted he was particularly looking forward to a 'few good uninterrupted nights' sleep' during his trip to Africa 

William (above, in Namibia) admitted he was particularly looking forward to a ‘few good uninterrupted nights’ sleep’ during his trip to Africa 

The Duchess of Cambridge, 36, has remained at home to look after the couple's young children Prince George, five, Princess Charlotte, three, and Prince Louis, who is just five months old. They are pictured at Louis' christening in July 

The Duchess of Cambridge, 36, has remained at home to look after the couple’s young children Prince George, five, Princess Charlotte, three, and Prince Louis, who is just five months old. They are pictured at Louis’ christening in July 

He has also noted that poaching has a human toll when rangers are killed, communities lose the benefits of wildlife tourism and criminal networks flourish. 

Shortly after arriving in Namibia, he attended a reception at the residence of the British High Commissioner to Namibia, where he addressed guests.

‘I’m delighted to be visiting Namibia for the first time. I’m only sorry that my wife Catherine is not able to join me – she is immensely jealous,’ he said.

‘Particularly as I’m looking forward to a few good uninterrupted nights’ sleep this week away from my wonderful children!’ 

William is currently visiting Africa to promote conservation efforts. He met with members of the local community in Kunene, Namibia (above)

William is currently visiting Africa to promote conservation efforts. He met with members of the local community in Kunene, Namibia (above)

The Duke of Cambridge set off with a dedicated team of rangers to track a black rhino in Kunene, Namibia 

The Duke of Cambridge set off with a dedicated team of rangers to track a black rhino in Kunene, Namibia 

William looked in very high spirits as he greeted rangers working on the conservation initiatives in Namibia 

William looked in very high spirits as he greeted rangers working on the conservation initiatives in Namibia 

The Duke of Cambridge said he was 'humbled by the dedication of the rangers who protect the unique population of desert rhino from poachers'

The Duke of Cambridge said he was ‘humbled by the dedication of the rangers who protect the unique population of desert rhino from poachers’

Explaining why he was visiting the country, he continued: ‘My visit to Namibia this week is focused on conservation. This is an issue very close to my heart, and I know is a matter of deep pride to you all as well. 

‘Your country is famous for its beautiful environment and wildlife. This is the reason why so many tourists, including tens of thousands of Brits, visit every year. 

‘Tourism continues to grow year on year and in 2017 accounted for 100,000 jobs – with the potential to add many more. Protecting Namibia’s wildlife is crucial to realising this potential.’ 

William added: ‘I have been very lucky to see first-hand today in the Kunene region some outstanding conservation work. 

During his trip, William met with members of the local community involved in the Kunene People's Park Initiative 

During his trip, William met with members of the local community involved in the Kunene People’s Park Initiative 

The Duke of Cambridge also viewed the work of Save the Rhino in Kunene, in his role as patron of conservation organisation Tusk 

The Duke of Cambridge also viewed the work of Save the Rhino in Kunene, in his role as patron of conservation organisation Tusk 

The royal set off with a dedicated team of rangers to track a black rhino in the Kunene region of Namibia on Tuesday 

The royal set off with a dedicated team of rangers to track a black rhino in the Kunene region of Namibia on Tuesday 

William later posed with those involved in the conservation efforts in Kunene (above), before returning for a reception in the Namibian capital of Windhoek

William later posed with those involved in the conservation efforts in Kunene (above), before returning for a reception in the Namibian capital of Windhoek

‘This is being undertaken with the support of the charity Tusk, of which I am patron, by both Save The Rhino Trust Namibia and IRDNC.’ 

During his trip to Namibia, William viewed the work of Save the Rhino in Kunene, before later meeting members of the local community involved in the Kunene People’s Park Initiative.    

Following a 5am start, he set off with a dedicated team of rangers  to track a black rhino, spotting a number of other animals along the way.

In his speech, Williams said he was ‘staggered by the beauty and sheer remoteness of this incredible landscape’, and ‘humbled by the dedication of the rangers who protect the unique population of desert rhino from poachers.’ 

Prince William was greeted by Tanzania's president John Magufuli after arriving in Tanzania for the next stop of his African tour 

Prince William was greeted by Tanzania’s president John Magufuli after arriving in Tanzania for the next stop of his African tour 

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, also attended a reception in Dar es Salaam (above) on Wednesday night, where he met with people working in conservation 

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, also attended a reception in Dar es Salaam (above) on Wednesday night, where he met with people working in conservation 

Prince William visited the port in Dar es Salaam (above) to witness some of the challenges faced in combating the illegal wildlife trade

Prince William visited the port in Dar es Salaam (above) to witness some of the challenges faced in combating the illegal wildlife trade

The Duke met with port workers to see how the UN Office on Drugs and Crime is working to stop the illegal exportation of poached animal products such as ivory and rhino horn 

The Duke met with port workers to see how the UN Office on Drugs and Crime is working to stop the illegal exportation of poached animal products such as ivory and rhino horn 

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