Wednesday, April 24, 2019
Home > News > Road police announce new technology that will scan driver’s EYES while they’re behind the wheel 

Road police announce new technology that will scan driver’s EYES while they’re behind the wheel 

More cameras, more fines: Road police announce new technology that will scan driver’s EYES while they’re behind the wheel

  • Cameras may have the ability to scan motorists’ pupils to detect levels of fatigue
  • A device would allow police to pull over people driving in an unsafe manner 
  • Researchers hope to utilise results found in a year-long trial to develop test 

New technology could soon help police detect when sleepy drivers are too tired to be operating a vehicle in the same way they test for alcohol in the breath.

Research is being done with high tech cameras and their potential ability to scan motorists’ pupils to detect their level of fatigue, Herald Sun reported.

Such a device would allow police to pull over people driving in an unsafe manner and scan their eyes roadside, while they are still in the car. 

New age technology could soon help police detect when sleepy drivers are too tired to be operating a vehicle in the same way they test for alcohol in the breath (stock photo)

New age technology could soon help police detect when sleepy drivers are too tired to be operating a vehicle in the same way they test for alcohol in the breath (stock photo)

Victoria Police endorsed the concept last year, but the VicRoads and Monash University joint study is still very much in the research phases.

At the completion of a year-long trial, researchers hope to utilise results to develop Australia’s first ever roadside fatigue detection test. 

The trial involves participants being kept awake for up to 32 hours before having their eyes monitored and taking part in a two-hour monitored drive. 

They would be inside a dual control vehicle and seated alongside a qualified driving instructor.

Victoria Police endorsed the concept last year, but it is still very much in the research phases in a combined effort between VicRoads and Monash University (stock photo)

Victoria Police endorsed the concept last year, but it is still very much in the research phases in a combined effort between VicRoads and Monash University (stock photo)

About 20 per cent of road crashes in Victoria have been caused by drivers being fatigued.

A vehicle access director, Roger Chao, believed the breakthrough technology had the capability to save people’s lives.

‘Roadside tests for drugs and alcohol have helped take impaired drivers off our roads — we want to see if a roadside fatigue test could have similar results and help keep all road users safe,’ he said.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk